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Events


Image: Tania Bruguera's Hyundai Commission, Turbine Hall launch (2018). Credit: Kirsty O’Connor PA

 

Join Create and partners Crawford Art Gallery (Cork), Counterpoints Arts (London), Cork City Arts Office and Heart of Glass (St Helens) for Create’s 2019 Networking Day for Collaborative Arts.

 

Where: Millenium Hall, Cork City Centre

When: 26th September 2019

Booking: via Ticket Tailor

Programme: Full programme available here

 

 

We invite you to a day of exchange and learning about artists’ practices, which operate in the spaces between socially engaged arts, pedagogy, and politics, in order to activate, stimulate, critique, and make change. The Networking Day promises to open up a space for us all to ask a shared and urgent question: how can collaborative forms of arts practice – engaging with the embodied experiences and knowledge of citizens – initiate and implement real civic agency and significant momentum for social change?

We will begin the day looking at the institution as commissioner, with a central focus on world-renowned socially engaged artist Tania Bruguera’s work on the Tate Modern Turbine Hall Hyundai Commission. Bruguera will be joined by Dr. Cara Courage, Head of Tate Exchange; Jane Wells, Programme Manager of Tate Exchange, and several Tate Neighbours. This session will be chaired by Áine O Brien, Co-Director Counterpoints Arts.

Working closely with the Crawford Art Gallery and Cork City Arts Office, we are delighted to offer a number of afternoon breakout sessions, which reflect current collaborative initiativesand artists’ practices in Cork and the wider region. 

Eve Olney of Art, Architecture and Activism will host NonViolent Communication within Social Collaborative Projects with Spyros Tsiknas and Giorgos Tsitsirigkos. This workshop employs real-life situations through the medium of theatre. Artist, curator and educator Fiona Woods offers Knowledge Commons: Cognitively mapping tools and methods of Collaborative Practice; this workshop will involve participants in a cognitive mapping of relevant knowledge commons, including the Arte Útil archive, and asks them to exchange tools and methods that they have discovered or developed through their own experience. Mid-point: Creative Enquiry Artists-in-Residence in conversation features Mary Brady of Cork City Council and The Creative Enquiry Artists in Residence Susan McManamon, Marie Brett, Colette Lewis in a roundtable discussion of how best to facilitate meaningful opportunities of creative engagement and dialogue with older people. Sociologist, activist and AIC Scheme Cultural Diversity Researcher Evgeny Shtorn will present The Politics of Representation in Art and Activism. This session will explore crucial and challenging questions around the ethics of representation and related tensions between art and activism.  Miguel Amado, Director of Cork Printmakers will present Undercommoning Curating: Collaboration Towards Co-creation and Community Development. This workshop aims to explore co-creation as a tool for undercommoning curating, examining how it may facilitate an art practice that responds to the needs, expectations and aspirations of socially excluded groups. 

Later in the afternoon, guest speakers will turn to the concept of citizens as commissioners. In the second panel of the day, chaired by Patrick Fox, Director of Heart of Glass, Sören Meschede, curator and coordinator of Concomitentes, Spain and artists Mark Storor, Stephen King, and Linda Curtin of the per cent for art project I Can Colour Between the Lines But I Choose Not To in Knocknaheny Cork will explore community-based commissioning and the politics of place. 

In the context of the Decade of Commemorations and how Ireland’s struggle for independence played out very vividly in Cork, it seems fitting that we close the day with a discussion about the notion of commemoration and the symbolic role of public art. To this end, we will be joined by Hammad Nassar, former Director of the Stuart Hall Foundation, current Paul Mellon Research Fellow and initiator of Let Our Statues Speak project, to reflect on questions of memory and whose history gets written in or out of the urban fabric in broader processes of commemoration.

The day will conclude with a reception to mark the launch of the new Create Strategy 2020-2024. 

 

Following the Networking Day, on the 27th of September, Counterpoints Arts will facilitate a Learning Lab: Art, Cultural Democracy and the City. This will be an in-depth conversation with key stakeholders and strategic players in the arts and cultural landscape who are influencing the evolving urban fabric of Cork.

 

 

Find our full programme here.

 

Further Information about Breakout Sessions

 

Booking for breakout sessions: After you book your place at Networking day, your ticket confirmation email will have a link directing you to reserve your place at your preferred session. Please note that you may only attend one breakout session. Those who have previously booked their place at Networking day will receive a follow up email with breakout session booking information. 

 

NonViolent Communication within Social Collaborative Projects. Eve Olney of Art, Architecture and Activism introduces a unique collaborative practice by Athens-based social artist/actor Spyros Tsiknas, and artist/ Non-Violent Communication (NVC) expert Giorgos Tsitsirigkos. Spyros and Giorgos combine theatre practice and explorative processes in constructing a setting in which participants consciously embody and think/act through conflict resolution. Eve Olney will contextualise these techniques and methodologies in terms of their usefulness and impact within everyday social collaborative and participatory projects. The setting for this session is within the current exhibition of the social project The Living Commons.

Artist, Curator and Educator Fiona Woods will present Knowledge Commons: cognitively mapping tools and methods of Collaborative Practice. This workshop will involve participants in a cognitive mapping of relevant knowledge commons, including the Arte Útil archive, and ask them to exchange tools and methods that they have discovered or developed through their own experiences. In this time of global emergency, many collaborative art projects seek to move beyond the production of ‘rehearsals’ for social change. Arte Útil proposes working with the resources of art to bring about meaningful transformation of socio-political realities.

Mid-point: Creative Enquiry Artists-in-Residence in conversation features Mary Brady of Cork City Council and The Creative Enquiry Artists in Residence Susan McManamon, Marie Brett and Colette Lewis in a roundtable discussion of how best to facilitate meaningful opportunities of creative engagement and dialogue with older people. The artists will share their creative approach to engaging older people in the processes of art making; consider the residency model as an effective access point for older people to creatively encounter arts practice; evaluate how these parallel residencies advance the work; and consider the legacy of the project

The Politics of Representation in Art and Activism will be explored by activist and AIC Scheme  Cultural Diversity Researcher Evgeny Shtorn and guests. This session will explore crucial and challenging questions around the ethics of representation and related tensions between art and activism. Representation as a concept must include the intersectional perspectives in which an artist operates, in terms of their own class, race, gender and sexuality, alongside those of the community within which they are working. This session will address these interrelated topics, examining the overlapping contradictions between activism and art.

Miguel Amado, Director of Cork Printmakers will present Undercommoning Curating: Collaboration Towards Co-creation and Community Development. This workshop aims to explore co-creation as a tool for undercommoning curating, examining how it may facilitate an art practice that responds to the needs, expectations and aspirations of socially excluded groups. Miguel Amado suggests turning curating into a civic practice, one committed to the undercommons: networks of solidarity that interlace within, against, and beyond the hegemonic ideology. Through undercommoning, curating moves away from the aesthetic parameters that have been defining the mainstream narratives of art, both historical and contemporary.

 

 

 

Image: Tania Bruguera's Hyundai Commission, Turbine Hall launch (2018). Credit: Kirsty O’Connor PA.
Image: Tania Bruguera's Hyundai Commission, Turbine Hall launch (2018). Credit: Kirsty O’Connor PA.

Create National Networking Day in Cork

26 September 2019

Join Create and partners Crawford Art Gallery (Cork), Counterpoints Arts (London), Cork City Arts Office and Heart of Glass (St Helens) for Create’s 2019 Networking Day for Collaborative Arts.  The Networking Day will facilitate collective exchange and learning about models of collaborative practice; ways of collaborative working which operate in the interstices between socially engaged arts, community expertise, pedagogy and politics. We look forward to hosting an exciting range of speakers and creating a dynamic space of exchange and learning in order to catalyse, critique and make change.

We will begin the day by exploring key questions surrounding economies of collaborative arts practice and how they relate to questions of spatial justice and social change. A central focus will be on the world-renowned socially engaged artist Tania Bruguera’s Tate Modern Turbine Hall Hyundai Commission. Co-Director of Counterpoints Arts, Áine O’Brien, will discuss with Bruguera the unique challenges initiated by the Turbine Hall commission: how cultural institutions can become places for collective civic action, citizen innovation, how they might catalyse transformative learning and inform new social relations. Bruguera’s work has since activated ways for local residents (called Tate Neighbours) to proactively infiltrate a cultural institution like Tate Modern.

Bruguera will be joined by Dr. Cara Courage, Head of Tate Exchange; Jane Wells, Programme Manager of Tate Exchange, and several Tate Neighbours: Shamus Dark, Charles Yassin, Debra Reiss and Natalie Bell. We will discuss with them how this recent commission re-imagines the public art institution as a place for forging different types of neighbourhood-based relations, where cultural and social policy can be imagined and tested; where what it means to act together as a civic collective can be explored.

Working closely with the Crawford Art Gallery and Cork City Arts Office, the Networking Day will reflect on current cross-city collaborative initiatives and artists’ practices in Cork and the wider region. In the afternoon we will further explore how collaborative arts practice catalyses dialogue between diverse fields of knowledge: popular culture, intercultural issues, social innovation, community and sustainable urban development. Workshops and conversations will be led by, among others, Miguel Amado, Director of Cork Printmakers and Eve Olney of Art, Architecture and Activism.

Sören Meschede, curator and coordinator of Concomitentes, will also join us. Located in Spain, Concomitentes encourages the creation of artistic projects devised and commissioned by groups of citizens. Meschede will outline how the Concomitentes programme emphasises the importance of art in social life, proposing a new system of art production involving the transformation of cultural policy.

In addition, with commissioned artists Mark Storor and Stephen King we will explore the Per Cent for Art commission and community-based project I Can Colour Between the Lines But I Choose Not To, presented and produced by the 2018 Cork Midsummer Festival, with residents and artists in Knocknaheeny, Cork.

In the context of planned commemorations relating to Ireland’s struggle for independence and taking account of how those struggles played out very vividly in Cork, it seems fitting that we close the day with a discussion about the notion of commemoration and the symbolic role of public art given the significance of 2019. To this end, we will be joined by Hamad Nassar, Director of the Stuart Hall Foundation and initiator of Let Our Statues Speak project, to reflect on questions of memory and whose history gets written in or out of the urban fabric in broader processes of commemoration. The Let Our Statues Speak project speaks volumes to the present moment in Cork – a city being actively reshaped against the backdrop of a rich history of struggle and against the contemporary resonances created by Brexit.

Following the Networking Day, on the 27th of September, Counterpoints Arts will facilitate a Learning Lab: Art, Cultural Democracy and the City. This will be an in-depth conversation with key stakeholders and strategic players in the arts and cultural landscape who are influencing the evolving urban fabric of Cork.

The Networking Day promises to open up a space for us all to ask a shared and urgent question: how can collaborative forms of arts practice – engaging with the embodied experiences and knowledge of citizens – initiate and implement real civic agency and significant momentum for social change?

Further updates and programme details will be posted on Create's website.

 

 

 

Check Up Check In 2018. Photo: Philip Cullen.
Check Up Check In 2018. Photo: Philip Cullen.

Check Up Check In 2019

11-12 April
Garter Lane Arts Centre Waterford, Waterford Healing Arts Trust

Booking:
- Tickets for Arts and Health Check Up Check In 2019 on Thursday 11 April cost €30 (including lunch)
- Tickets for the workshop with Marie Brett, “Sustaining the Self” on Friday 12 April cost €10 and must be booked separately. Places for this workshop are limited, so advance booking is essential.

Create are delighted to partner once again with www.artsandhealth.ie / Waterford Healing Arts Trust (WHAT) to present Arts + Health Check Up Check In 2019.  Following the tremendous success of Check Up Check in 2018 and marking the opening in 2019 of the new South East Palliative Care Centre at University Hospital Waterford (UHW), the theme of this year’s event is Promoting Autonomy, with presentations highlighting the potential for arts programmes in healthcare settings to explore ways for individuals to engage, discover and create, even when faced with a challenging health condition.  In his keynote address, Disruption, Danger and Discipline: When the Artist becomes Leader…, Nigel Hartley will reflect on the role of the artist in end of life care and the artist as leader.  He will further share his vast experience and offer practical advice for negotiating the challenges of working in this important and rewarding area in a workshop setting later in the day.

Uisce Salach (Dirty Water). Photo: Robert Corrigan.
Uisce Salach (Dirty Water). Photo: Robert Corrigan.

Uisce Salach (Dirty Water) is a new collaborative sound art project about contested water issues in Ireland. Softday, the art-science collaboration of artist Sean Taylor and computer scientist Mikael Fernström, are initiating a collaborative art process leading to the creation of a significant citizen’s art-science project based on water analyses from domestic water supplies from the River Liffey, its tributaries in Dublin City and from Dublin Port. The key aim of the project is to enable citizens living and working along the River Liffey to participate in scientific research with creative outcomes. Working with those residents, schools, community organisations, fishing clubs along the river and workers in Dublin Port, the project will synergise science and arts practice using water sampling and creative technology, developing new thinking and new meaning around the sustainability of water resources.

Using established methodologies, Softday will issue water test kits to participating citizen scientist to gather small water samples, (which can be from their own kitchen tap, well, local River Liffey tributary, or whichever source of clean water that matters to them) on World Water Day, Friday 22nd March 2019. Softday will analyse all samples and use the data to construct a map with the underlying data sets, as well as producing a unique sound composition as part of a major multi-media installation, which can be played by humans and computers and shared via the web and social media. The world premier of Uisce Salach (Dirty Water) will be performed live by the Irish Chamber Orchestra in combination with the “Softday Citizen Scientist Ensemble”, a form of public laptop orchestra, in Dublin in November 2019.

Uisce Salach (Dirty Water) will increase awareness of the environmental, economic and social value of water. This project will be facilitated by Dublin Port’s Port Perspectives Engagement and Education Programme to access networks of community organisations around the port as well as port workers and supported by CREATE to reach community and interest groups such as fishermen along the River Liffey. Uisce Salach (Dirty Water) is suported by an Arts Council Arts Participation Project Award 2019.

For twenty years Softday has engaged with issues relating to climate change and its global effects. As an award winning collaborative team they use their arts practice to explore relations to and understandings of nature, expressed through sonifications, multimedia artworks and public performances, such as Amhrán na mBeach (Song of the Bees, 2013-15) and Sounds of the Unthinkable (2018). Softday use various media and creative genres to create art works that speak of the urgent need for social action.

Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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Creative Time Summit 2018

Creative Time Summit 2018 - Dublin screening & panel discussion

Join us for this international convening for thinkers, dreamers, and doers working at the intersection of art and politics

As an official off-site host, Create, Fire Station Artists’ Studios and the National College of Art and Design’s MA in Socially Engaged Art and Further Education are delighted to partner again to host this exciting live streaming of the Creative Time Summit, an annual presentation of the world’s leading socially engaged artists and activists, coming this year direct from Miami, Florida.

Date: Friday 2 November 2018
Time: 3-11pm
Venue: Harry Clarke lecture theatre, National College of Art & Design, 100 Thomas Street, Dublin 8
Admission: Free (registration recommended)
Optional dinner by Luncheonette: €10 per person (registration required, payment in cash on the night)
More info & Reserve your place: eventbrite.ie

This year the Summit is titled On Archipelagos and Other Imaginaries: Collective Strategies to Inhabit the World, with four thematic sections:

•    On boundaries and a borderless future
•    Facing climate realities, reimagining a green future
•    Towards an intersectional justice
•    Resisting displacement and violence

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