Arts and Civil Society Symposium Presentations

Defining Participation and Practice – Policy Perspectives panel. Seated left to right: Martin Drury, Pat Cooke, Fiona Kearney (Chair), Marian Fitzgibbon, Pauline Conroy.

Defining Participation and Practice - Policy Perspectives
Presentation for Create and Voluntary Arts Ireland, Arts and Civil Society Symposium 20/21 October 2011

Martin Drury
Arts Director, The Arts Council

 

Arts and Civil Society [.PPS slideshow]

Pat Cooke. Art and Civil Society Symposium.

Defining Participation and Practice - Policy Perspectives
Presentation for Create and Voluntary Arts Ireland, Arts and Civil Society Symposium 20/21 October 2011

Pat Cooke
Director of the MA in Cultural Policy and Arts Management, University College Dublin

 

The Artist, Arts Policy and Cultural Democracy [.PPS slideshow]

Pauline Conroy. Art and Civil Society Symposium.

Defining Participation and Practice - Policy Perspectives
Presentation for Create and Voluntary Arts Ireland, Arts and Civil Society Symposium 20/21 October 2011

Dr Pauline Conroy
Social Policy Analyst

 

Notes from Nowhere

The defining of civil society has been well summarised by Mick Wilson in his paper On understandings of civil society.
In a political sense, civil society is that which is not of the State, its extensions in armies and police, political parties or party political system and most of the market.

• Civil society is the people, or a people without the structures of domination or authority independent of their citizenship status.

In this sense civil society is relatively autonomous from the State. It is the behaviour of the ordinary person including their sense of civility towards each other. 

Emanating from this interpretation is an argument for the abolition of formal art and art institutions, in the destruction of which people might be invited to participate. This may be visible in the Dadaist movement in art and literature of the early 19th century or the Situationist movement in France, Belgium and the UK in the 1960s and 1970s.

In the words of  situationist writer Raoul Vaneigem:

The only forms of creativity that authority can deal with, or wished to deal with, are those which the spectacle can recuperate. But what people do officially is nothing compared with what they do in secret. People usually associate creativity with works of art, but what are works of art alongside the creative energy displayed by everyone a thousand times a day: seething unsatisfied desires, daydreams in search of a foothold in reality, feelings at once confused.

Vaneigem’s association, or indeed fusion, of art with the acts and gestures of everyday life pulls towards popular participation in the destruction of the spectacular or the features of commodity or monetarisation in which art is clothed.

Read more... [PDF] 

Defining Participation and Practice – Policy Perspectives panel. Seated left to right: Martin Drury, Pat Cooke, Fiona Kearney (Chair), Marian Fitzgibbon, Pauline Conroy.

Defining Participation and Practice - Policy Perspectives
Presentation for CREATE, Arts and Civil Society Symposium 20/21 October 2011

Marian Fitzgibbon
Head of School of Humanities, Athlone Institute of Technology

 

Ill fares the land
To hastening ills a prey
Where wealth accumulates
And men decay.

So said Oliver Goldsmith in 1770. I am indebted to the late historian, Tony Judt, for an informed overview of where we in Ireland stand at the moment. How appropriate and poignant both that his excoriating account of greed takes its title – Ill Fares the Land – from the work of an Irish poet! I am also indebted to him for the solace he affords us all in a time of undisputed crisis. 
In a masterful sweep through the recent economic history of the western world, Prof Judt offers a trenchant insight into the current state of world affairs and relegates three countries in particular - the US, the UK and Ireland - to a group that exemplifies the ugliest sides of contemporary Western society. 

To me it was revealing and somewhat shocking to realise the extent to which Ireland, along with the UK and US, are out of kilter with the rest of the first world.  We are so distinguished by the degree of adulation we have afforded to the market and the contempt we have shown for the public space. 

In Judt’s words, this club of three countries is the one (and I quote) “in which the dogma of unregulated self-interest was most assiduously applied to public policy” (Judt, 2010a; p.16). We bought the profit motive hook, line and sinker. The results are plain to see: relative to the rest of the western world, we are now in a highly unequal country. This has pervasive consequences - for health, education, social justice, life chances, mobility, length of life, school drop-out rates, mental illness, literacy, criminality, public transport, obesity. And of course for the arts.

Read more... [PDF]

Keynote speaker Dr. Anthony Downey being introduced by Create director Sarah Tuck. Art and Civil Society Symposium.

Keynote address
Create and Voluntary Arts Ireland, Arts and Civil Society Symposium 20/21 October 2011

Dr Anthony Downey
Programme Director of the M.A. course in Contemporary Art at Sotheby’s Institute of Art, London

 

"For the Common Good? The Politics and Ethics of Co-opting Civil Society into Contemporary Collaborative Practices"

[What follows is a precis of the keynote given by Dr. Anthony Downey at the Arts and Civil Society Symposium. The full script will be uploaded in the new year]

In the last decade we have seen a twofold development in the arts: an ascendant pattern of collaborative and participative practices that has in turn brought with it a shift away from terms such as gallery visitors, spectators, and viewers to ideals such as participant, collaborator, active audience and, in some cases, protagonists.

To date, participative and collaborative practices — in their co-option of the institutions of civil society — have been given a corroborative status within the context of museums and cultural institutions: they “include” the civic sphere and provide “access” to institutional contexts and in so doing fulfill funding and other less tangible requirements.

The initial point I would make is therefore somewhat obvious: recent cuts in social welfare services —throughout the United Kingdom and Ireland — and the opportunistic withdrawal of corporate sponsorship have brought with them the attendant ideal that civil society will step into the breach left by those cuts and, in turn, make good any shortfall in public funding and social cohesion.

Read more...

Community Arts Partnership logo.

LAB Debates - Working in Context
Presentation for Create and Voluntary Arts Ireland, Arts and Civil Society Symposium 20/21 October 2011

Conor Shields
Director, Community Arts Partnership

 

Presentation on the work of the Community Arts Partnership [.PPS slideshow]

Silvana Carotenuto. Art and Civil Society Symposium.

Arts, Civil Society and Crisis
Presentation for Create and Voluntary Arts Ireland, Arts and Civil Society Symposium 20/21 October 2011

Silvana Carotenuto
Associate Professor of English at the University of Naples L’Orientale

 

Spreading the revolt” by the occupied Teatro Valle - Rome

To occupy the Teatro Valle is, for us, a desiring act, and a gesture of re-appropriation: we occupy in order to occupy what belongs to us, because only the ones who love a place can take care of it. It is a gesture that establishes a public space, a word taking. This attempt takes place within the physicality of bodies, conjuring an element that belongs to the order of passion: in art, as much as in militancy, we experience zones of experience of major intensity, of a better - creative, political, human - quality. It is a process of liberation from the unbearable rhetoric of power and of neo-liberalism, that has made us imagine ourselves as lonely individuals, that has made us cultivate the illusion that being alone means being free.

For many of those who are traversing the occupation, the feeling of creating something that was not there before, is very strong. And the perception of such transformative power gives us the measure of the desert we have been experiencing in the last 15 years, marked by a progressive erosion of rights and a consequent precarization of life.

Read more...

Sign up for the Create e-bulletin


Create on Twitter

Arts and Civil Society Symposium

http://www.create-ireland.ie/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/242881kevin_murphy.jpg

Kevin Murphy

Voluntary Arts Ireland Chief Officer Kevin Murphy introducing the Create and Voluntary Arts Ireland Arts and Civil Society Symposium, 20 and 21 October 2011, Christchurch, Triskel Arts Centre, Cork.

http://www.create-ireland.ie/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/889360Pat_Cooke.jpg

Pat Cooke

Defining Participation and Practice - Policy Perspectives. Martin Drury, Pat Cooke, Marian Fitzgibbon, Pauline Conroy. Chair: Fiona Kearney.

http://www.create-ireland.ie/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/816834Defining_Participation_and_Practice___Policy_Perspectives.jpg

Participation and Practice

Defining Participation and Practice – Policy Perspectives panel. Seated left to right: Martin Drury, Pat Cooke, Fiona Kearney (Chair), Marian Fitzgibbon, Pauline Conroy.

http://www.create-ireland.ie/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/618198Sarah_Tuck_and_Dr_Anthony_Downey.jpg

Sarah Tuck, Dr Anthony Downey

Create Director Sarah Tuck introducing the keynote address by Dr Anthony Downey.

http://www.create-ireland.ie/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/960238Engaging_Communities___The_Permeable_Institution.jpg

Engaging Communities debate

Engaging Communities – The Permeable Institution. One of three concurrent LAB Debates. Left to right: Lisa Moran, Topher Campbell, Declan McGonagle (Chair), Tom Creed, William Ring.

http://www.create-ireland.ie/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/429458LAB_Reports_panel.jpg

LAB Reports panel

LAB Reports panel. Left to right: Liz Burns, Robin Simpson,  Tony Fegan (Chair), Declan McGonagle.

http://www.create-ireland.ie/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/804572Rethinking_Cultural_and_Civic_Space.jpg

Cultural and Civic Space

Rethinking Cultural and Civic Space. Pictured (left to right): Mícheál Ó Domhnaill, Annette Moloney, Bernadette Quinn (Chair).

http://www.create-ireland.ie/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/265531Rethinking_Cultural_and_Civic_Space2cx.jpg

Annette Moloney

Rethinking Cultural and Civic Space. Pictured (left to right): Annette Moloney (presenting), Bernadette Quinn (Chair), Frank McDonald, Faisal Abdu’ Allah.

http://www.create-ireland.ie/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/837714Arts_Civil_Society_and_Crisis_cx2.jpg

Arts, Civil Society and Crisis

Arts, Civil Society and Crisis panel. Pictured (left to right): Augustine Zenakos, Carlota Álvarez Basso, Daniel Jewesbury (chair), Gabriel Gbadamosi, Silvana Carotenuto.

http://www.create-ireland.ie/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/733708Daniel_Jewesbury_and_Nuno_Sacramento.jpg

Nuno Sacramento

Arts, Civil Society and Crisis. Pictured: Daniel Jewesbury (chair), Nuno Sacramento. Arts and Civil Society Symposium, Cork, October 20-21, 2011. All photos: Susan Walsh.

http://www.create-ireland.ie/components/com_gk3_photoslide/thumbs_big/137739create_volunteers.JPG

Create volunteers

Christian Buchner, Katia Rush-Hall (Symposium Coordinator), Aoife O'Leary, Pamela Murray. All photos: Susan Walsh.